*FIRST: Coyote Coexistence Guidelines and Safety Information

VIDEOS ON COYOTE BEHAVIORS, GUIDELINES & DOGS:

A ONE-STOP INFORMATION VIDEO on urban coyotes: coyote behavior and how to coexist with them, how to handle encounters, and why killing them does not solve issues.  Press https://youtu.be/euG7R11aXq0 to go directly to YouTube. [Condensed version: http://youtu.be/1Kxl31nX0rc]

Para la versión en Español, haz clic aquí: http://youtu.be/FjVGKwLiYG4;

In Mandarin Chinese 普通话: http://youtu.be/aFWyegSrNHw

*Please note our protocol change (not in our video) for when walking a dog: The best policy is TOTAL AVOIDANCE: Whether you see a coyote in the distance, approaching you, or at close range, leash your dog and walk away from it, avoiding any kind of confrontation or engagement. This will minimize the potential for dog/coyote interactions. If you feel inclined to shoo it away — following the guidelines in the videos,  you may try this, but our preferred approach now is TOTAL AVOIDANCE.



LINKS TO UNDERSTANDING COYOTE BEHAVIOR + DOGS:

citizencoyote-by-janetkessler

*A Quote Worth Pondering

“If you talk to the animals they will talk with you and you will know each other.  If you do not talk to them you will not know them, and what you do not know you will fear.  What one fears one destroys.”      Chief Dan George

Charles Wood, a frequent contributor to Coyote Yipps, adds: “I want to try and express Chief Dan George’s words a little differently, though I believe the meaning is the same: ‘If you talk to the animals they will talk to you and you will come to know them. When you come to know them, you will love them, with respect, without fear. What one fears one destroys. What one loves one defends.'”

ACTUAL BLOG WITH LATEST POST BEGINS BELOW

Citizen Coyote: Let’s Get To Know Them: An Introduction

The English version of our coyote informational video aimed specifically at younger people and classroom use — but wholly interesting and fun for all ages — is up and running! The Spanish version was posted last week, so students who really want to learn about coyotes AND improve their language skills, may now toggle between the two videos. There are slight differences between the two, which will make working between them a bit more interesting. As with the other informational videos I’ve put out, this one is based primarily on my first-hand observations here in San Francisco, and corroborated by research and by other experts in the field.

Again, we encourage EVERYONE, student or not, youth or not, to create the projects suggested at the end of the video to share with others. The more people we can reach by sharing this information, the better it will be for all concerned: people, pets, coyotes. The end result will be a win-win-win situation without any losers!

The English version was narrated by my neighbor, Stephanie Shmunes, who, you’ll see, did a great job!

 

Another Howling-at-Sirens — A Surprise!


Coyotes often howl at sirens. So, I listened for howling after hearing a siren, and indeed I DID hear howling. It was an incredibly *little* sound, without quite the force and reach of a coyote’s howl, but, nevertheless, it was a true howl. Enjoy!

Ciudadanos Coyotes: Vamos a conocerlos: Una Introducción

Here is our new Spanish educational video specifically for youth — 5th through 8th graders — but fun for everyone! I was asked to create this for some of the Spanish immersion classrooms here in San Francisco. The English edition should be up next week. Students who really want to learn about coyotes AND improve their language skills, will be able to toggle between the two videos.

And we encourage EVERYONE, student or not, youth or not, to create the projects suggested at the end of the video to share with others! It’s only through sharing that people will learn what they need to know to coexist amicably with the wildlife which not long ago began moving into our urban areas.

Ana Bayat, who is a playwright, actress and voice-over artist, and who lives in my neighborhood, provided the narration. Thank you, Ana!

Gifts From The Universe, By Charles Wood

Dear Charles —

This is an absolutely gorgeous story!! What a beautiful “gift” the universe gave you, and what a gift YOU have for being able to see it! You tell it well. You always have told your stories well. May I share it on Yipps? You were a a big part of Yipps — many people will remember your postings about Mom, Dad, Shy, Bold, Rufus and Mary, and that you and Holtz and Lucas used to watch the coyotes together. I miss your Yipps contributions!

One of the reasons for not *killing* or *removing* coyotes is that coyote territories soon are refilled by newcomer coyotes, often within a matter of weeks. I assumed that your coyote territory, where you had made all of your observations, had not been filled by another family since we no longer received postings, and I wondered why.

I asked you about the territory. You replied with the wonderful story below, explaining how strongly the coyotes had impacted your life. About sharing this, you said, “Sure, let’s do it.” Thank you! Janet

Good to hear from you, Janet:

As to Mom and Dad coyotes’ territory. Rufus and Mary may not have stayed. But I did see coyotes there 49 days after Lucas, Lynne and my German Shepard, died. 49 days in Japanese traditions is the day the soul leaves us. (Lynne is third generation JA). So I went out with ailing Holtz and took Lucas’ leash so as to take Lucas’ soul on his last walk with Holtz and me.

I was texting Lynne as I did so. It was late twilight. I had in my mind that I would release Lucas’ spirit from the leash once we reached Mom and Dad’s old territory. I texted Lynne that I saw a coyote. I hadn’t seen one. Instead I was creating a good-bye in our imaginations. Then I texted her that I saw a second coyote. Then I texted her that OMG it was Mom and Dad. Which of course it couldn’t be because Mom and Dad died years ago. Then I said wait. There’s a third canine. A pause. I texted Lynne:  “It’s Lucas with Mom and Dad!” It was a sad yet happy good-bye to Lucas’ spirit.

Janet. As soon as I had texted that to Lynne about seeing 3 canines:  I looked into the field and saw that there were indeed three, real, live canine’s in Mom and Dad’s old territory. To be certain, I used my flashlight to light up their eyes. I took a picture of the light reflecting back from their eyes. I can’t explain it, but I take gifts when the universe offers them to me.

So there are coyotes in Mom and Dad’s old territory. I wanted to let you know that.

Charles

three coyotes

three coyotes


Seasons Greetings, 2016!

kesslerjanet_coyote-sitting-cross-legged

This little yoga-posing coyote — she looks like she’s sitting cross-legged in a lotus position — became a first place winner in WildCare’s 2016 photo contest. For other contest winners, and to donate to this wildlife organization, please visit: http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/support-us/2016-living-wildlife-photography-contest-winners/

Poop Bags In Coyote Country

2016-11-05

Coyote sniffs a poop bag to assess what it is

“Has anyone else noticed all the used dog poop bags that dog walkers throw to the sides of trails in the parks? I find it disgusting, and the arrogance and entitlement on the part of these dog walkers is appalling. I know some dog walkers will say that they only leave the bags for an hour or so before returning on their way home to pick them up. However, it’s never legal to litter, even temporarily, and most of these bags sit for days, even weeks, before they get picked up by someone else or tossed into the bushes. Even if you plan to pick it up on the way out, this is considered littering.”

The above is a quote from the Facebook page of a dog-owner’s group I visit. Poop bags left around seem to be a growing problem in the city. I was spurred to post this when I saw a coyote giving her opinion of the problem by peeing on a bag!

2016-11-05-1

A coyote gives her opinion of the problem

Photos From Coyoteyipps Now On Instagram!!

instagram1

Check out photos from coyoteyipps at  https://instagram.com/coyoteyipps/ and follow them if you want! Each posted photo comes with a little snippet of information about coyotes or coexisting with them. It’s another way to connect to the urban coyotes in San Francisco.

Previous Older Entries