Sign the Petition to Stop Gassing Coyotes at Seal Beach

UPDATE: Seal Beach, California, Reportedly Plans to Continue Killing Coyotes!

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Despite a public outcry, Seal Beach, California, officials have reportedly decided to extend their coyote killing spree for three more weeks. During this time, coyotes will be trapped and gassed to death—a terrifying demise for these sensitive wild animals who seek only to sustain themselves and their families. In addition to being cruel, this lethal initiative is futile because more coyotes will simply move in from outlying areas to use available resources and remaining pack members will breed at accelerated rates, so their numbers will actually increase.Your voice is once again needed!

Coyotes are attracted to areas with dense rodent populations, therefore trash containment, trimming back vegetation, and prohibiting wildlife feeding will encourage them to move on. Please urge the city to cease trapping and instead promote humane control measures, then forward this alert widely!

Please read and sign the petition NOW!

Coyote Friend of Mine, by George Davis

2014-09-30 at 18-18-59

Coyote friend of mine, if only I could trade my nose for snout, my mouth for jaws, my skin for fur, my feet for paws, then we could run together, coyote friend of mine.

I had the opportunity to watch two coyotes on a gravel beach at the break of dawn here in Maine, one just sat in the morning sun soaking in the sun. Watched them both for about a half hour. I was in a boat so I don’t think they knew I was there. Wow, they stole my heart thus the poem.

Too much hatred and misunderstanding in these parts, makes me cry for them, no really. Saw a sign on a pickup truck that said Gods Guide Service: deer, coyote and bobcat hunts. Are you f……ing kidding me or what! I will have those signs one day, just has to be done.

Your film is great and I have sent your email address to a few friends of mine. A few of us got together last fall to cut down nine dead coyotes from a tree in front of this yo yo’s house. I mean they were right next to the road, why, why, why? Maybe he got the message because we haven’t seen them there again. One for us!

Anyhow, thank you for all of your good work in helping these wonderful animals, these friends of mine. Rage against the hatred!……..George Davis

[reposted from a comment on our coyotecoexistence.com site]

Seal Beach Residents Demonstrate Against Coyote Killings

Please support the group “Empty Cages Los Angeles” in their effort to stop trapping and gassing coyotes in Seal Beach, California. Coexistence requires little effort, entailing a modicum of education about coyote behavior and about simple guidelines that work. Let’s use our knowledge, not our fears, to deal with our urban wildlife.

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2014/10/05/demostrators-protest-against-coyote-killing-in-seal-beach/

Chinese Version of “Coyotes As Neighbors” is ready for viewing

I am pleased and proud to present a third version of our one-stop video presentation, “Coyotes As Neighbors” in Mandarin Chinese.

A huge thanks to the folks — every single one a community and/or professional volunteer — who spent hours working with me on this video project so that we could get useful coyote information out to people who are less comfortable with the English language. The video now can be seen and heard in English, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Cantonese speakers, of course, will be able to read the Mandarin version even though the voice-over will be unintelligible to them.

My long-time friend Sylvia Chen, a special needs instructor with a Ph.D. in Neurolinguistics from Taiwan, spent many days interpreting and translating the text for the Mandarin version, minutely working out nuances of meaning for the Chinese speaking community. Zhu Yanan, from Beijing, only 23 years old and an international law student at USF — and a magician who practices “slight of hand”! — generously lent us his fabulous voice for the voice-over in Chinese and suggested I put some music into the background, which I did.

Two more long-time friends, Luz Andino, a Spanish teacher from Argentina at the San Francisco Friends School, and María José Phillips from Spain, with a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and adjunct professor in the Spanish Department at the University of San Francisco, worked many, many hours, separately, on the translation, and Rafa Unzueta Daly, a photojournalist from Chile who studied at USF, lent us his awesome voice for the Spanish voice-over.

Thank you all for giving so much of your valuable time and intense effort to this project. What an amazing and very special international group! I had fun working with you all and had fun putting the final work together in these videos! Congratulations to you all and thank you for supporting sharing of the environment with our wildlife!

A Coyote Encounter – with Dogs – from One Of Our Readers

One of our CoyoteYipps visitors sent us a description, and took the attached two short videos involving a coyote encounter with dogs. I am reposting the comments and videos because they display normal coyote behavior that everyone needs to be aware of if they have a dog. More often than not, a coyote will simply flee when it sees a walker with dogs approaching it, but there are times when it may react as it did to Samira. Coyotes are territorial animals. This is still  pupping season for coyotes — it’s a time when coyotes are particularly protective of their areas.

Hi Janet —
Today I had an encounter with a coyote that unsettled me. I was walking my two dogs, one very large (~90lbs) German Shepherd, and one medium-sized Beagle/Cattle Dog mix (~40lbs) on a wooded path. I never see other people walk here, so I let them go unleashed. About five minutes in, we came across a coyote who barked, howled, and followed us. My dogs immediately started chasing the coyote, and when I called them back to me, the coyote followed. Since I thought the coyote was heading in the opposite direction, I continued further into the woods, but it continued to follow us. Though my dogs have good recall, they seemed unable to resist the urge to chase the coyote (particularly since the coyote was acting surprisingly playful) and the cycle of chase-return-follow happened several more times. My German Shepherd in particular was enjoying himself; normally he is very wary and protective and often takes offense to other dogs at first sight. It honestly surprised me that he didn’t attack. Though we didn’t appear to be in any danger, the fact that the coyote was so doggedly following us (it even went as far as the asphalt path next to the road as we exited) made me nervous, and I booked it out of there was fast as I could.

I’m having trouble understanding if the coyote’s behavior was as playful as it seemed to be, or if it was (as you’ve mentioned in this blog) meant to “escort” us out of its territory. Is it safe for us to go back? I’ve walked them there many times without any incident, albeit during the mid-afternoon (today we got there around 6pm, later than usual).

I’ve uploaded two videos:


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Hi Samira –

Thanks for writing about your encounter. The videos you sent are excellent in that they depict exactly what can go on when you encounter a coyote with dogs. What you encountered was normal coyote behavior. Dogs and coyotes don’t like each other — it’s important to keep them apart. It’s a good idea to keep your dogs leashed once you see a coyote — please don’t allow your dogs to chase them. If it followed you to the edge of the forest, it was assuring itself that you were indeed leaving the area. It could have been a youngster coyote who was curious about your dogs, but more likely, the coyote could have been trying to divert you away from youngsters in the area by making you focus on it.

If you don’t want to walk elsewhere, when you do walk through this forest, please make sure to leash and keep walking until you are out of the area. With your dogs leashed and next to you, the coyote is unlikely to approach. You have a large dog and a medium size dog — still bigger than coyotes who weigh 20-40 pounds — on the East Coast they are slightly larger. Also, you have two dogs which constitute a “pack”. When dogs are part of a pack, they are much more self-assured and they work together. They can do incredible damage. It is the coyote which is endangered by this situation, not your dogs. Also, you should be armed with knowledge of how to shoo off a coyote if it gets too close to you: you can see how to do this by watching the video at the top of the coyoteyipps home page. Please let me know if you have any more questions. Also, may I post your videos on the blog? — the more people who see this as a potentiality, the better they can be prepared to deal with it. Thank you! Janet
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Hi Samira,

Going just by the short videos the coyote doesn’t come off to me as wanting to play. I too have had encounters like yours, over several years with a coyote couple and their children. Janet has been kind enough to let me post pictures and video on her blog and my coyote encounters almost always involved dog, human (my dogs and me), and coyotes messaging their territorial concerns to us. So the way I interpret your coyote’s behavior is that he is herding your dogs out of the area. (Actually you were doing the herding by calling your dogs back.) It’s hard to know with any certainty, but there may be something in that particular area the coyote cares enough about to claim and it looks to me like me may be broadcasting his claim to your dogs. Charles
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Thank you for the response! I probably won’t return to this area of the woods anytime soon – we have a lot of other spots to choose from. And yes, you can use my videos. For reference, we are in Eastern MA, in a suburban neighborhood.

In A Wheat Field, Excellently Camoflauged

coyote is in the center of the photo in case you have trouble finding it

coyote asleep in a wheat field

Here’s a little fella who looked up at me before plopping down onto the ground and out of sight right there in front of me as I watched. If you didn’t know he was there you would not have seen him. From most angles I could not see him, even though I knew exactly where he was!  It is only because he moved a little that I was able to relocate him again.

For a while he engaged in some scratching and grooming. Then he was down and out and unfindable again!

 

 

Goodwill Teasing!

There was almost no light, and there were tall grasses between the camera and the coyotes, so these photos are totally washed out and blurry. However, the behavior depicted in them is absolutely fabulous: I decided it was worth it to post them, so I enhanced them as best I could.

A little female yearling coyote “teases” her dad and then her brother by affectionately stretching herself on top of them, and either nuzzling their legs as in the case of her father, or nuzzling their ears, as in the case of her brother! Her behavior was good-willed fun. It was not meant to provoke any kind of reaction — it was simply a display of her affectionate teasing. It looks like this little gal has two BFFs!!

She had been out alone, whiling away the time until the daily family get-together/rendezvous time.

Then her brother appeared and he was absolutely ecstatic to see her. He seemed to “jump for joy” as she and their dad approached him: first he performed one bounce, then one squiggle sitting down, and finally a jump, squiggle and bounce all at the same time!

2014-06-17 (8)Then they all piled up together where there were the usual kisses/nose-touches and wiggly-squiggly movements which are a dead giveaway for the excitement and joy they were feeling.

 

After the general excitement of the initial encounter and greeting died down, the female youngster “hopped on Pop”. It was affectionate contact that they both soaked up. She then twisted her head down and around him and gave him little love nuzzles and bites on his legs. Wow!

The three then broke out into an intense play session: they chased each other wildly, they wrestled, they groomed each other — no photos because the movement in tall grasses with no light just shows blurs. These are all activities which regularly follow the initial rendezvous greetings after spending the day apart sleeping.

During the intensive play period, the female youngster jumped on her brother, as she had done to her dad earlier. Only this time she tugged at one of his ears and then the other, teasing him affectionately.

They played intensively some more and then ran off and out of sight. They would spend the night trekking!

 

photos 6-17pm

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