Urban Coyote Myth: Coyotes Luring Dogs to Their Deaths (Revised and Updated)

In fact, it’s simply an urban myth that coyotes lure dogs to their deaths. But if that’s the case, what actually is occurring for people to fabricate such an idea? Well, it may in fact look like that if you don’t know what’s going on. Whenever there is a void in knowledge, the void is filled in with what there is: speculations, rumors and myths that pop up suddenly or become legendary and grow over time.

So what is actually going on when dogs chase coyotes and eventually they find themselves confronted by more than one coyote?

First of all, dogs chase coyotes all the time. If you keep your dog leashed in coyote areas, or leash and walk the other way the minute you see a coyote, you can minimize the chance that this will happen. Most coyotes are out minding their own business: either foraging, trekking or resting, when they are spotted by a dog. The chase then begins: it’s fun and games for most dogs, but seldom so for the coyote.

The coyote may try to *lose* the dog by wearing it out, or it may head to a hiding place to get away from the dog. But unbeknownst to the dog, and to the human owner, coyote family members are almost always close by. Coyotes travel together, and they rest fairly close to each other, so there’s almost always another coyote or two around.

Once a dog enters into where the coyotes are, it will be treated as any other intruder, be it an outsider coyote or your dog: coyotes will come to the aid of another member of their family. And, if a coyote sees a dog chasing its mate, it will come out to help the coyote drive the dog off. These are defenses to threats, not *lures*.

The coyote’s behavior has nothing to do with a *plan* to *lure* the dog into a trap to kill and eat it.

Please note that “luring” into a trap situation to kill is very different from “leading” a dangerous animal away from pups. Coyotes do lead any threatening animal, including humans, away from very sensitive pupping areas, hoping they will be followed. They have led me away in this manner several times.

[https://coyoteyipps.com/category/coyote-luring-myth/]

 

42 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. August Strozier
    Sep 09, 2016 @ 17:30:40

    Maybe you can help explain this scenario. I live on 100 acres in a very rural area of south Texas. We have a robust coyote population (you can hear them howling almost every night from all directions). I was out walking this morning with two of my dogs following. Both are large, athletic dogs who have survived plenty of coyote interactions (they’ve never injured or killed any to my knowledge). I spotted a coyote about 20 yards away. It yelped, drawing the dogs attention, they paused with ears erect, it yelped again and they took off after it. The dogs were quickly out of sight, but I could hear the coyote yelping all the time. I followed, calling out to the dogs to come back. I came up to where the coyote had stopped, still yelping as if it were injured, hidden right behind the tree line in a dry creek bed. My dogs had apparently obeyed my calls and headed back home.
    I climbed up a nearby tree to try and see down into the creek bed. I couldn’t see anything, but the coyote continued yelping. After about ten minutes, the yelping ceased and a coyote, (it seemed to be a larger individual) came out of the brush and looked around for a moment, and then went back. I waited another five minutes or so, (no more yelping), and then left. It certainly struck me as some type of feigned injury ambush strategy, although they certainly would have had a hell of a time with those two dogs. A few years ago a small dog I had was killed and eaten in that same area early one morning. I hold no grudge against them, and enjoy listening to them howl of an evening. Just thought this was interesting behavior and was looking for some input. Thanks.

    Reply

    • yipps
      Sep 11, 2016 @ 03:44:32

      Hi August —

      I’m updating my reply to you after having re-read your comment. The coyote’s yelping was actually triggered by the presence of your dogs in what they consider their area, possibly close to other coyote family members or even in a denning site. Most likely, there was antagonistic eye-contact before the chase began.

      I’ve seen this distressed yelping behavior often. After being chased by dogs, the coyote runs off to a safer space away from the dogs and engages in a long drawn out and distressed vocalization: it’s almost a complaint, or venting of their frustrations. Coyotes also engage in this very same distressed vocalization when they see what they perceive as threatening dogs in the area, especially if one/some of them have pursued the coyote in the past. Simply SEEING those dogs was a trigger.

      “Luring” had nothing to do with what was going on in the situation you describe. Again, please be aware of the power of myths. Once introduced to myths for which no other explanation has been offered, the fabrications often stick and it’s hard to change them. Try looking at the situation logically, no animal is going to use itself as a “lure” where it could be injured: any injury could ultimately lead to death: wouldn’t that be akin to suicide?

      Also, if this was in fact a “hunting” strategy, then because of its “uniqueness” in the mammal world, it would have been noticed and studied and written about by the many scientists who have studied coyotes — but nothing can be found about it in the scientific literature.

      Coyotes are pursuit predators – they chase their prey, they don’t “lure” and “ambush” prey. Lure and ambush hunting strategies are almost exclusive to certain fish, insect and reptile species, and carnivorous plants. [Wikipedia]

  2. Morgan
    Nov 17, 2016 @ 21:24:57

    The coyotes where you live much be special, because those of use who live in semi-rural and rural areas have lost plenty of dogs to coyotes who lured them away from safety.

    Reply

    • yipps
      Nov 19, 2016 @ 00:18:06

      This is not true. The dogs went chasing after the coyotes and should not have done so. Please let folks know to keep their dogs from going after coyotes — this is safest for the dogs AND the coyotes. Janet

  3. William Logan
    Dec 14, 2016 @ 05:40:49

    You make these cunning coyotes sound like the old-time “loose woman” who lured helpless, innocent young men into temptation and trapped them with her feminine wiles.

    Just like those yong men, your dog was curious and went willingly. Because that’s what dogs do.

    Reply

  4. Randall S Hardy
    May 01, 2017 @ 17:29:48

    For many years, I had a pet coyote/dog cross. The mother coyote had pups in my tool shed. I saw her only a few times, each time she heard or smelled me first and fled. As she left, I saw that she held one back leg off the ground and hopped or limped away using just one back leg. I have always believed that her injury is what caused her to live close to people and mate with my neighbor’s dog. However, today I happened upon a coyote den. The mother was about 50 feet away when I saw her, and she limped off into the woods on one back leg. Coincidence? or is feigning an injury a stategy to lure predators away from the pups?

    Reply

    • yipps
      May 01, 2017 @ 17:52:09

      Hi — The biggest cause of death for coyotes in urban areas is cars. When a car doesn’t kill outright, it may leave a lasting injury. I’ve been documenting a coyote with a limp who we know was hit by a car only a few days ago. Five years ago I watched a mother coyote raise her two pups singlehandedly (father coyote had been poisoned) after being hit by a car. It took this coyote months to recover. The injuries are real. I’ve heard of other animals feigning an injury as a lure, especially birds and of course opossums play dead, but I’ve never seen a coyote fake an injury.

  5. Randall S Hardy
    May 01, 2017 @ 18:18:06

    Hi Janet, thanks for the quick reply. For 25 years I have thought that the mother of my coydog had been shot or hit by a car, I only wondered about it being a stategy when I saw another mother act the same way today. When I first saw her, I was about 20 feet from a pile of concrete slabs that had been dumped and she was about 50 feet. After she left, I could hear sounds coming from from the concrete pile so I guessed she had dug under them to have her pups. I gave the whole area a wide berth after that so she wouldn’t be afraid to return. The one that had pups in my tool shed would leave for a whole day everytime I stepped into my back yard, but her behavior may not have been normal.

    Reply

    • yipps
      May 01, 2017 @ 19:11:28

      Hi Randall — I’ve seen coyotes leave their pups all day long. I don’t think this is unusual mother coyote behavior. They do so to go hunting. It’s during this period of time, when the pups are young, that mothers need extra nutrients to produce enough milk. Fathers hunt extra hard during this time, too, in order to bring more food home. Fathers actually eat the food and then regurgitate it for the pups. Mother coyotes may do the same later on. I’ve cautioned people not to *rescue* *abandoned* pups because, more than likely, they have not been abandoned at all — they’ve simply been left for the day by the parents who went a-hunting!

      You are doing great by giving the mother you saw today a wide berth. I wish more people were as respectful as you are. Thank you for your input, and thank you for abiding by their needs. Do you have a photo of your coydog? I would love to see it! Janet

    • yipps
      May 02, 2017 @ 03:43:54

      Hi Randall — Here’s information from Wikipedia:

      “Distraction displays, also known as diversionary displays, or paratrepsis are anti-predator behaviors used to attract the attention of an enemy away from something, typically the nest or young, that is being protected by a parent. Distraction displays are sometimes classified more generically under “nest protection behaviors” along with aggressive displays such as mobbing.These displays have been studied most extensively in bird species, but also have been documented in populations of stickleback fish and in some mammal species.

      Distraction displays frequently take the form of injury-feigning. However, animals may also imitate the behavior of a small rodent or alternative prey item for the predator; imitate young or nesting behaviors such as brooding (to cause confusion as to the true location of the nest), mimic foraging behaviors away from the nest, or simply draw attention to oneself.”

  6. yipps:janetkessler
    Nov 23, 2017 @ 05:15:53

    The “luring” myth is no less than a form of blaming the victim: it’s the dog who went after the coyote, not the other way around. The myth is a fabrication to excuse the dog’s transgressions (or actually the owner who should have kept his/her dog away).

    Reply

  7. Bo
    Dec 02, 2017 @ 00:40:07

    Anyone care to explain why the hell coyotes come up to the edge of my yard on multiple occasions and start wimpering like they’re injured when my dog has never even come in contact with them? I know the area I live in, the coyotes have PLENTY of acres to roam they certainly don’t inhabit the areas surrounding my yard. They come specifically to the edge of the woods and pretend to be hurt until we scare them away with intimidating noises.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Dec 02, 2017 @ 13:03:45

      Hi Bo — I’m sorry the coyotes are an irritant for you. I don’t believe they are pretending to be injured — the “whimpering” sounds are simply among the sounds they make all the time. If you continue to scare them off, they’ll eventually, probably, stop coming back.

  8. Bush Girl
    Dec 18, 2017 @ 21:21:23

    You are entitled to your viewpoint, but I have lived in the Canadian north a long time. I have indeed observed coyotes and wolves coming close and making very strange sounds in an attempt to lure dogs. I have also seen a wolf lure an unleashed dog, then the waiting pack that was previously hidden, close in. For any predator to survive, calories expended must be less than those gained. Luring is a very effective way to hunt. If a predator spends the day tracking and searching for prey, they may expend more energy than gained by their meal. Sometimes wolves and coyotes become habituated and learn an easy food source. These are very intelligent animals and very capable of learning.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Dec 18, 2017 @ 21:45:30

      Hi Bush Girl — Thanks for your thoughts. This article was written because there are folks out there who incorrectly believe as you do. Please re-read the posting to know what is going on. Wolves and coyotes often travel with their families. It’s important to keep dogs leashed in areas where there are coyotes and wolves because they often chase after these animals, only to find there are more of them than expected. Please keep your dog away from these wild animals if you want to keep them safe! That’s all that needs to be done!

  9. Bush Girl
    Dec 18, 2017 @ 21:27:45

    Please forgive the swearing in this video – but I believe the sound is actually a habituated wolf luring village dogs. When I think of all the things canines can learn, they constantly amaze me.https://youtu.be/25lzRlwz_u4

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Dec 22, 2017 @ 19:32:42

      Dear Bush Girl — Thank you for sending this, because it is a beautiful example of exactly how myths are born. You have written what you *believe* is going on, without a shred of evidence except your own fears. The posting to which you are responding was written based on many, many documented observations of this same behavior. Wolves and coyotes have plenty of calories for hunting, or they wouldn’t spend so much of their time racing and playing with each other.

  10. Jennifer
    Feb 14, 2018 @ 15:19:51

    Just my opinion here. It seems to me that coyotes are being generalized here, like a specific breed might be… I believe they do have generalized behavior, meaning most of them will behave the same. But that may not be the case everywhere all the time. They are very clever and adaptive. I think their behavior most likely is determined by their environment. For example, during hunting season, while people are in the woods shooting guns, the coyotes in my area come closer to homes and target cattle. (Easier, more available prey) While generally, they just come get their prey, they may not all be opposed to luring on occasion, if it better suits their needs at that time. I would think the point would most likely be to draw an animal away from humans rather than the actual need to lure to kill. Again, just my opinion. (Some info about me= I live surrounded by forest, hear and see coyotes regularly and I also rescue dogs. So at any given time, I can have several dogs of various sizes (though, usually small) in my yard and a coyote will just go by, not paying any attention to the dogs…. or cats. Even when all the dogs are barking like crazy. The coyote just has no use for them. (Thank goodness) (Sorry to all who have lost their furbabies)

    Reply

  11. Sheila Beard
    Aug 27, 2018 @ 01:31:10

    Janet, I live in a semi rural area of Missouri and I can assure you that coyotes DO ambush prey. Our 15 y.o. deaf terrier was ambushed on our front porch 2 nights ago. There were 3 of them. Luckily, my husband was able to scare them away. They nearly killed him tho. Our dog stopped chasing other animals about 2 years ago when he lost his hearing AND became arthritic. Trust me, he was on the porch and they came and got him!!

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Aug 27, 2018 @ 03:44:42

      Hi Sheila —

      I’m sorry your little deaf terrier was so traumatized — it sounds horrible. But glad he survived!

      I think you are confusing some terms here.

      An AMBUSH is “a military tactic using concealment and surprise to attack an unsuspecting enemy from a concealed position.” I’m not sure this is the correct term for what you are describing, since neither prey nor predator used concealment.

      Irregardless, the point of this posting is “luring”. Luring is not ambushing. LURING is to attract or entice the dog into a trap to kill and eat it. Coyotes would never put themselves, using their bodies, at risk for death by engaging in this.

      So it sounds as though your pup was indeed attacked because the coyotes thought of him as prey. Not ambushed. Not lured.

      Please don’t leave your pet unattended out of doors: coyotes don’t know who is a pet and who is not.

      Hope this helps!

      Janet

  12. Diana Samuels
    Feb 03, 2019 @ 04:11:28

    Is it safe for a dog to play with a coyote? Is it normal for the coyote to engage in play like that?

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Feb 03, 2019 @ 04:40:10

      Hi Diana — Coyotes and dogs should be kept apart. Coyotes tend to be distrustful and wary for survival purposes. They are high-strung and “ready to react” much more than dogs are. Dogs are the opposite: they’ve been bred out of these traits to be companions to humans. The two know they are different from each other. I’m sure there has been some form of play between dogs and coyotes, but what I have seen is less “play” and more “testing” activity. In addition, allowing your dog to interact with a coyote on any level just breaks down innate barriers that keep both species apart and safe. The main interaction I’ve seen between dogs and coyotes is dogs chasing coyotes; some dogs get nipped for doing so.

  13. Steven G
    Mar 11, 2019 @ 18:32:39

    We live across from a wooded lot. Part forested area, part open space and part wetland. There is a den of coyotes that live just by the wetland. We often see their tracks, and if we venture towards the wetland will often see at least one. The one I will call the alpha, has an interesting relationship with my shepherd. Bridget is always on a leash when we are close to their main areas, but both Bridget and the coyote will simply sit and watch each other without a sound from a distance of usually about 300′. Each time we see it, this happens until one or the other gets bored with it and we/him/her move along.

    I don’t know how many people know where there den is, and I do not share that information because I fear someone will try to either shoot them or poison them. But, these animals are beautiful. Their coats are thick and they look very healthy. I think Bridget and I both enjoy just watching them.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 11, 2019 @ 19:06:15

      Hi Steven — Nice story! When dogs leave coyotes alone, very often there results a respectfulness. It looks like you’ve encouraged your dog to think this way, and the coyote is reciprocating, helped with keeping your distance. :)) Yes, please keep the den a secret: that’s what the coyotes want. Appreciatively! Janet

    • Steven G.
      Mar 11, 2019 @ 19:09:01

      I will Janet. And we will keep enjoying just watching them.

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 11, 2019 @ 19:19:19

      Sounds perfect! Lucky you! Lucky Bridget! :))

  14. Kathy
    Mar 12, 2019 @ 14:03:48

    I used to walk my Jack Russell Terrier, named Johnny in an open field near the forest. Nearly every day, without fail, we would see a young coyote that would come out to greet us… Johnny would get very excited, and the coyote seemed to know my dog was on a leash and just walked around acting as though she wanted to play.. We would sit on the grass and just watch each other from a short distance for about an hour….She was beautiful..
    One day, my pup pulled the leash out of my hand after the coyote came out of the tree line.. Johnny ran through very thick blackberry bushes, and was several hundred feet deep into it when he got stuck.. He started yelping, and I was a bit concerned that the coyote may come back and attack my dog because he was utterly helpless. Luckily I had a cellphone and called my mom to bring a tool to cut down the blackberries….lol. She brought a hoe.🤓 It took over an hour for her to bring it to and It took several hours of exhausting work to get to him.
    The coyote had the chance for itself, or family members to kill Johnny before I had a chance to start freeing him, but nothing happened, except for my dog being frightened , (by his own misdeeds:)
    Sadly, we never saw the coyote after that.., I would call out to it but it never showed itself again… I believe that the chase frightened it so much that it decided coming out wasn’t worth it anymore:(
    I miss the interaction, but it was probably for the best.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 12, 2019 @ 14:12:50

      Thank you, Kathy, for sharing this. The story tells much more about coyotes than the maligning luring myth does. The chase along with the dog’s yelping probably terrified the coyote. And yes, it was probably for the best, but I’m so glad you were able to enjoy him/her for the time that you did. :)) Janet

  15. Gina Edwards
    Mar 15, 2019 @ 06:04:37

    I also was believing of this lure in dogs to eat and believe it when I watched a documentary on coyotes here the other day and in the documentary they showed a coyote acting as if it was playing with a bison calf and the coyote acted as if it was playing but was trying to get the calf to follow and in the documentary they said that the coyote was trying to lead the calf off away from the adults to kill and eat it, so I made this comment on another post and others who study them let me know that the coyote that was in the neighborhood displaying the same play behavior so that is why I through that, so this coyote in this neighborhood and probably not near a den what was he doing with the dog, was he wanting to play, I mentioned that the dog should not be running lose because I knew that coyotes will eat dogs, can u explain to me here what was probably going on

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 15, 2019 @ 17:30:33

      Hi Gina —

      From what I’ve seen, what “looks” like “play” behavior should more accurately be described as “testing” — testing how far the dog will go in terms of approaching the coyote or being aggressive, testing the dog’s good or ill will. They’ll do so almost provokingly, but also almost playfully, so it’s confusing to someone who only knows about domestic dog play-bowing, for instance. I’ve seen coyotes and dogs enter into short, amicable chases with each other, but one is seldom if ever allowed to get close enough to touch the other.

      The coyote will run off if he/she feels threatened or in danger. That’s a protective move, not a “lure”. If the dog follows or chases, it might well be seen as a threatening gesture by other coyotes nearby, so they will come to the coyote’s defense by attempting to drive the dog away. It’s best to keep dogs and coyotes apart, and it’s so easy to do: the minute you see a coyote, leash and go the other way.

      Hope this helps! Janet

  16. Sherilee
    Mar 15, 2019 @ 21:44:42

    I was wondering if you could help me understand an incident that we recently had with coyotes and one of our labradors.
    We live in a rural area with our horses and 3 labradors. We have peacefully co-existed with coyotes and actually appreciate the job they do helping to control the rabbit and rodent populations.
    We were out with our dogs feeding our horses a few weeks ago. One of our labs took off after a coyote that was next to the horse corral. We called him & he immediately came back to us. The coyote followed him back. When we saw the coyote, we hazed him (as we always do so they don’t become too comfortable with humans) and he left.
    We watched and he joined 2 adult coyotes that were hanging back watching the event.
    Do you know why that coyote followed my dog back? I’m sure that most people would say that he was trying to lure him to be attacked by his waiting companions. Your post above makes sense to me regarding how this can be a myth. But I am curious why that coyote would risk following an 85 pound dog.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 16, 2019 @ 20:57:32

      Hi Sherilee — It’s hard to tell without being there and actually seeing what went on, but is sounds as though the coyote — after assessing that your dog wasn’t going to hurt him (after all, your dog gave up the chase) — might have been engaging in a little show of “oneupmanship” or even “bravado” — a kind of standing up for himself. If your dog would have turned on the coyote again, that coyote would have fled quickly, and the adults might have come to his defense, but that didn’t happen. Does this make sense to you? Janet

  17. Sherilee
    Mar 17, 2019 @ 19:06:51

    Yes, that makes sense to me. I can see that he may have been very curious why my dog only followed him for a short distance. We do see this particular “gang of 3” (as we call them) quite often. They seem to keep their distance and watch us from afar. They do come in closer at night because our motion activated cameras have caught pics of them. Our dogs are never allowed out at night so I’m sure know it’s safe for them. And they are more than welcome to take as many rabbits and pack rats as they can possibly consume :)

    Reply

  18. Jade Rooney
    Mar 19, 2019 @ 01:48:42

    I’m sorry but the article here is completely inaccurate. Coyotes most certainly lure dogs out of farm yards to ambush them. It has happened to my own dogs. You should watch how a single coyote will lure a buffalo calf away from the herd, by playing with it. Once at a safe distance from the herd the attack commences. While I wholeheartedly agree that dogs should be kept on leashes in unfamiliar areas, I would recommend keeping some type of weapon to beat off an overly aggressive coyote, particularly if you have a small dog. I have heard of coyotes scooping up cats right in front of their owners in the yard. They are a predator after all and humans without experience around them should be cautious and attentive to their dog. They will smell a coyote long before you see it.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 19, 2019 @ 03:22:07

      Hi Jade — Please look up the word “luring”. This article is strictly about “luring”. It is not about ambushing, or separating a calf from the herd, or about grabbing a cat. Luring means enticing, tempting, attracting by pretending to be something that the lured animal wants, mostly to eat. So, for instance, lures are used to catch fish. A meatball might lure an animal into a trap. If your dog was confronted by more than one coyote when it went off chasing one, that’s not a lure. That’s simply a coyote running away from danger and then its family members appearing to help him/her out. Please keep your dog from chasing coyotes and this won’t happen. Hope this helps! Janet

  19. Jade Rooney
    Mar 19, 2019 @ 18:49:31

    Janet, the difference, luring and ambushing boils down to semantics in this situation. A single coyote will imitate the barks of my dogs. This is the lure out of the safety of the yard. The ambush happens once the dog can be incircled by the other pack members. My dogs need to be outside to protect the horses on my farm from the various wildlife in my area. The lure isn’t giving chase to my dogs, it is the imitation bark, calling them out. The dogs want to defend their territory, in this instance the coyotes are definitely the intruders.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 19, 2019 @ 19:01:26

      Jade — You are incorrect. If the coyotes were dogs, would their barking be lures? I don’t think so. Barking is not a lure. Coyotes make all sorts of sounds, and barking is one of them. What’s happening is that your dog is pursuing coyotes whose voices he recognizes as coyotes. Your dog is not mistaking these sounds for the sounds of a dog. Coyotes have indeed grabbed small dogs, but it’s not because they were “lured”.

  20. Jade Rooney
    Mar 20, 2019 @ 19:20:18

    So when someone uses coyote calls or an electronic caller would that not be considered a lure? I would consider a lure to be any type of attractant for an animal, included but not limited to the sounds they make. Coyotes can be dangerous especially on the farm. I deal with them almost every day through the winter.

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Mar 20, 2019 @ 19:33:52

      Hey Jade — Yes, HUMANS indeed do “lure” their targets with all sorts of deceptive imitation calls, pretending to be rabbits in distress or something like that, to deceive the coyote. That indeed is what luring is. Coyotes are not pretending to be what they are not. If your dog decides to pursue the coyotes, it’s because he knows they are coyotes, he doesn’t think they are dogs, and the coyote is not pretending to sound like a dog. You need to train your dogs to not go after coyotes. If you can’t train them, you should restrain them. By the way, farmers are finding that, by not persecuting coyotes (i.e., killing them) a peaceful coexistence results! Here’s the link if you are interested: Observations of Coyotes on Ranches: https://coyoteyipps.com/2018/10/09/observations-of-coyote-behavior-on-ranches-by-walkaboutlou/.

  21. Daniel J Morgan-heredia
    Apr 23, 2019 @ 21:23:35

    Hola Yipp!

    I recently heard an anecdotal story of a farmer who had chicken coops. He said that coyotes would befriend the dog, and the dog wanting to fit in, would help get into the coop. Then once that was over, the coyotes would ambush and kill the dog. Any ideas on this?

    Reply

    • yipps:janetkessler
      Apr 23, 2019 @ 22:04:16

      Hi Daniel — You said this was an anecdotal story, but I suppose it could happen. I do know coyotes who befriended a single female coyote in her territory who showed them around. Soon they kicked her out and took over the territory. Territoriality is ownership, and others are driven out.

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